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Historic US Win For Korea

History was made at Calder in Florida on September 6 when the David Braddy-trained Feel So Good became the first Korean-bred thoroughbred win a race outside his home country.

Historic US Win For Korea

History was made at Calder in Florida on September 6 when the David Braddy-trained Feel So Good became the first Korean-bred thoroughbred win a race outside his home country.

The seven lengths win was witness by five representatives of the Koran Racing Authority including spokesman Byung-un Ko who said the victory would be big news Korea.

"We really didn't expect the horse to win, but as soon as he did we called the KRA to tell them. Then we sent all the pictures and videos to South Korea to release the news to the papers and television stations.


"The guys I spoke to at home said it was huge news and that all the people were very happy for what had happened.

Racing in Korea dates back almost 100 years but its racing and breeding industry is only just evolving on the international stage.

"We started racing in Korea around 1922, but we didn't send horses overseas until a few years ago," Ko said.

"We wanted to find out how our racing had developed and wanted to see how our horses compared to the American horses."

"We set out to find the reason why our horses could not beat the American horses. We wanted to find out if it was a training problem or the horse's problem.

"Feel So Good is a Korean horse. We had him in the US since he was young and the horse learned to race here and was taught by American trainers.

"I think maybe we found out that the problem is not the horse."

Feel So Good was shipped to Calder in August of 2011 and his win came at his third career start.

The gelding is now to make a lengthy return trip to Korea that will eventually lead to the sales ring where the KRA will seek a private owner for the horse.

"The KRA doesn't own any racing horses but this case was a special exception because it was viewed as an experiment," Ko said.

"It was already decided that the horse would go back whether or not he won or lost. We plan on selling the horse and are hopeful that the selling price will set a new record."

The Braddy barn will retain a link with Korea as prospective trainers Hee-jin Yang and Min-Sung Gu are to stay with the trainer for a one-month apprenticeship.

"These days we are trying to do international things," Ko explained. "We try to send jockeys all over the world, we just won a race in the US with one of our horses and now these new trainers will stay to learn how to manage a stable.

"We haven't decided yet if we will send more horses to the United States but I think we will be happy to send more.

"We believe that Mr. Braddy is one of the leading trainers in Florida and I think that in the future we'll do more business with him and with Calder."

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