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Bulls crush Redbacks in Shield wicket-fest

A string of low-scoring Sheffield Shield matches suggests use of the Dukes ball is still a work in progress, including preparation of suitable wickets.

Bulls crush Redbacks in Shield wicket-fest

A string of low-scoring Sheffield Shield matches suggests use of the Dukes ball is still a work in progress, including preparation of suitable wickets.

MICHAEL NESER of the Adelaide Strikers celebrates the wicket of Cameron White of the Melbourne Renegades during the Big Bash League match between the Adelaide Strikers and the Melbourne Renegades at Adelaide Oval in Adelaide, Australia.
MICHAEL NESER of the Adelaide Strikers celebrates the wicket of Cameron White of the Melbourne Renegades during the Big Bash League match between the Adelaide Strikers and the Melbourne Renegades at Adelaide Oval in Adelaide, Australia. Picture:Photo by Darrian Traynor/Getty Images

Australia skipper Travis Head says the preparation of wickets in the second half of the Sheffield Shield season is not matching up to the challenges brought about by the Dukes Ball.

The second successive low-scoring contest at the Gabba concluded on Wednesday, with Queensland defeating South Australia by 43 runs in a match that was over before lunch on day three.


More wickets fell than boundaries scored at the Gabba, such was the dominance by ball over bat in a match which produced just 447 runs.

The English Dukes ball has featured in the second half of the Shield season over the past few summers.

"The seam of the Duke(s) is completely different to the Kookaburra, and we are probably still making wickets for a Kookaburra ball which is making it extremely difficult for the batters," Head said.

"It is just that balance at the moment that we are trying to get between the wickets and the ball.

"It is a nice ball but we just have to get the tracks right.

"I would probably like to see the wickets have a bit more pace and be a bit faster."

Not that the seam bowlers are the only one to prosper, with South Australia's inexperienced left-arm spinner Tom Andrews taking career-best figures of 9-82.

The opening day saw 17 wickets fall, with 20 on day two.

After conceding a 44-run deficit on the first innings, South Australia entered day three at 7-94 only to be bowled out for 131.

Such was the paucity of runs, Jake Lehmann's second innings knock of 42 for South Australia was the highest in the match for either team.

The defeat means SA will retain their wooden-spoon, having made the final in the two preceding seasons.

The Redbacks will have a final opportunity to get a win on the board next Wednesday when they host Victoria.

"The way we were able to battle back last night and today means we are moving forward, but it is a results-based game," said Head.

Defending champions Queensland jumped to third with the win but need a bonus-point laden victory over Western Australia next week, combined with an unlikely set of results to keep their campaign alive.

"It was one of those games where it was sort of see-sawing the whole through," said Queensland captain Jimmy Peirson.

"I think it is a good cricket ball.

"I think both teams found it hard to bat, with tough conditions the whole way through with the Duke(s)."

AAP


AAP




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