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Hosking says cyclists' stand has paid off

Chloe Hosking says the selection controversy around the women's team for the world road championships helped establish mutual respect.

Hosking says cyclists' stand has paid off

Chloe Hosking says the selection controversy around the women's team for the world road championships helped establish mutual respect.

CHLOE HOSKING of Australia leads the field to the finish line during the Women's Road Race of the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games at Currumbin Beachfront in Gold Coast, Australia.
CHLOE HOSKING of Australia leads the field to the finish line during the Women's Road Race of the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games at Currumbin Beachfront in Gold Coast, Australia. Picture:Photo by Phil Walter/Getty Images

Commonwealth Games gold medallist Chloe Hosking is seeing massive dividends from the selection controversy in Australian cycling two years ago.

The successful backlash against the controversial selection decision for the 2017 world road championships has become a watershed moment.


Hosking said it established mutual respect in Cycling Australia's new regime between the top women road riders and management, led by high performance director Simon Jones.

She pointed to her gold medal at the Gold Coast Games and Amanda Spratt's silver medal at the world championships last year as examples of how well the women's national road team is performing.

Jones took over as Cycling Australia's performance boss in the wake of their Rio Olympics disaster and Hosking is impressed with what is happening.

One of Jones' first big calls two years ago was to pick a women's team for the road worlds that was short two riders.

Hosking and Rachel Neylan successfully appealed against their non-selections and Australia ended up entering their full quota of riders.

After the appeals process, Jones had a face-to-face meeting with the women's road team.

"It was a really positive thing that actually ended up coming from what started as a negative situation," Hosking said.

"From my perspective, it established mutual respect among everyone.

"We really stood up for ourselves and said this is what we stand for, this is what we believe in and we're not just going to sit down and roll over.

"That really spoke volumes to people."

Australian Kat Garfoot, now retired, won silver in the road race and bronze in the time trial at those world titles.

Last year, Hosking's gold medal and Spratt's silver showed further improvement as preparations continue for the Tokyo Olympics.

"Particularly in 2018, there was all this shakeup at Cycling Australia and it's been a really positive thing," Hosking said.

"We've been able to go into races like the Commonwealth Games and world championships with really crystal-clear race plans.

"Every rider has known their role and there's been no second-guessing on the road.

"It's resulted in really great results for Australia."

Hosking has no doubt that will continue later this year at the worlds in Yorkshire, an important stepping stone to next year's Olympics.

"Regardless of what happens at Yorkshire, I know we'll go in with a really good plan and we'll be racing for one rider," Hosking said.

"I have a really great relationship with Simon now and CA. I have only positive things to say about all the changes that are happening there."

AAP


AAP




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